Reentry Webinar Series

Webinars posted here are part of a series about When Survivors Reenter their Communities after Jail or Prison

#1 — A Woman's Journey Home: Challenges for Reentering Women

Webinar date: April 10, 2013

Webinar Description: During the past 25 years, our knowledge and understanding of women's lives has increased dramatically and this information has impacted and improved services for women, particularly in the areas of health, education, employment, mental health, substance abuse, and trauma treatment. At present, however, both a need and an opportunity exist to bring knowledge from other fields into the criminal justice system to develop effective programs for women, including those reentering their communities after serving time in jail or prison. Until recently, theory and research on criminality focused on crimes perpetrated by men, with male offenders viewed as the norm. Historically, correctional programming for women has thus been based on profiles of male criminality or paths to crime. However, the policies, services, and programs that focus on the overwhelming number of men in the corrections system often fail to identify gender- and culturally responsive options for women's specific needs. While men and women face some similar challenges upon returning to the community, the intensity, multiplicity, and specificity of their needs, and the most effective ways for addressing those needs, are very different.

Presenter Bio: Dr. Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., is a clinician, organizational consultant, and lecturer. For over twenty-five years her work has focused on the creation of gender-responsive and trauma-informed services. Her extensive experience includes designing women’s services at the Betty Ford Center, developing programs for women in criminal justice settings, and being the featured therapist on the Oprah Winfrey Network TV show entitled "Breaking Down the Bars." She has also served as a consultant to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna and was selected for the federal Advisory Council on Women's Services. Educated at Columbia University and the Union Institute, Dr. Covington has served on the faculties of the University of Southern California, San Diego State University, and the California School of Professional Psychology. She has published extensively, including six gender-responsive, trauma-informed treatment curricula. Dr. Covington is based in La Jolla, California, where she is co-director of both the Institute for Relational Development and the Center for Gender and Justice.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar series is supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#2 — A Second Chance: The Kentucky Domestic Violence Association's Reentry Coaching Project

Webinar date: May 29, 2013

Webinar Description: This webinar will give an overview of the Kentucky Domestic Violence Association's (KDVA) 2nd Chance Coaching Project, a mentoring project for reentering women. The Coaching Project, funded by a grant from the Second Chance Act, is a unique collaboration of a state domestic violence coalition, local domestic violence programs, and other key individuals and programs. The webinar will include a Project description, details about Project implementation, and the importance of including formerly incarcerated women as part of the work. This webinar will present one model of providing services to reentering women and is designed to create dialogue among domestic violence advocates who provide services or are considering providing services to incarcerated and formerly incarcerated battered women.

Learning Objectives:

Presenters' Bios:

LeTonia A. Jones, MSW has been an activist and advocate working in the area of ending violence against women and girls for 15 years. She received her MSW from the University of Kentucky in 2004. Currently, Ms. Jones is employed as the Advocacy Programs Administrator and the 2nd Chance Coaching Project Director for the Kentucky Domestic Violence Association. Ms. Jones also serves as an expert witness in cases involving domestic violence, lobbies, and leads the KDVA Women and Incarceration Project that includes clemency work. She also builds collaborations using the arts as a tool to end violence against women and girls.

Loretta Gilmore, CSW has been a domestic violence advocate and activist for 5 years. Ms. Gilmore received her MSW from the University of Kentucky in 2011, graduating in advance standing. She has been employed at the Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program in Lexington, KY since 2008, where she began as a practicum student. Since that time, she has fulfilled the role of resident manager, administrative supervisor, student internship supervisor, family advocate, and now she is the 2nd Chance Coaching Coordinator. Ms. Gilmore was licensed as a CSW since 2011 and is currently practicing clinical social work under supervision.

Antoinette M. Johnson is a formerly incarcerated survivor. She has extensive knowledge of the issue of domestic violence and the incarceration of battered women because she has lived and overcome both. In her role as a consultant to the Kentucky Domestic Violence Association, Ms. Johnson serves as a speaker on their Formerly Incarcerated Women's Speaker's Bureau and a group facilitator for the KDVA 2nd Chance Coaches' Project. Ms. Johnson also advocates on behalf of those like her and shares her personal experience with youth groups, university students, and others interested in ending domestic violence. Currently, Ms. Johnson is pursuing a degree in Criminal Justice and resides in Louisville, KY.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is partially supported by the Family Violence Prevention & Services Program of the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DHHS or the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#3 — Victimized Again: How the Reentry Process Perpetuates Violence Against Survivors of Domestic Violence

Webinar date: May 29, 2013

Webinar Description: This webinar will focus on work being done at Our Place DC, an organization that provides guidance and services to help currently and formerly incarcerated DC women craft better lives. Their model is quite unique because it emphasizes comprehensive social and legal services. The legal services are especially critical for survivors because often getting a protection/restraining order is made more difficult by the requirements imposed by community supervision (parole/probation). Additionally, legal services can help increase access to employment/housing/mental health and other services critical to survivors as they move toward independence.

Presenters will discuss best practices for providing domestic violence social and legal services to formerly incarcerated women and the need for comprehensive services. Additionally, presenters will discuss how the re-entry process perpetuates violence amongst an already vulnerable population - survivors of battering.

Presenters' Bios:

Courtney Cross is currently the Staff Attorney at Our Place DC, where she focuses on providing direct legal services to formerly incarcerated DC women, especially those living in DC's most underserved wards. After completing her Equal Justice Works/AmeriCorps Fellowship with Our Place - wherein she represented clients in domestic violence and family proceedings as well as in parole revocation hearings - Courtney began working out of the organization's new satellite space out of the Mayor's Office of Returning Citizen Affairs in Southeast Washington DC where she continues to provide direct representation, brief advice, and community education to clients. Before joining Our Place DC, Courtney worked as a victim advocate at Survivors and Advocates for Empowerment, also in the District..

Katrina Cheshier is a Case Manager in Our Place DC's Re-Entry Services Department. Katrina meets with soon to be released clients in DC's women's jail and federal prisons to develop service plans. She collaborates with community partners to implement clients' plans and assists reentering clients with immediate and long term goals such as housing, financial assistance, substance abuse treatment, and medical and mental health services. Prior to joining Our Place, Katrina served as DC SAFE's Lethality Assessment Project Advocate, where she worked exclusively with high-lethality clients coordinating comprehensive inter-agency responses to meet each client's safety needs. She has also worked as a Project Assistant at the Legal Resource Center of Violence Against Women and as a Victim Advocate within both the Montgomery County, MD Sheriff's Office and the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, MD.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar series is supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#4 — Formerly Incarcerated Women Talk about Reentry

Webinar date: June 19, 2013

Webinar Description: This webinar features three formerly incarcerated women who became advocates (for themselves and other incarcerated women) while serving time in state prison, and have continued their advocacy since they have been out. They will talk about strategies and interventions that are most needed by reentering women to help facilitate successful reentry after serving time in prison.

Presenters discuss:

Presenters' Bios:

Brenda Clubine is a domestic violence survivor who offers a unique perspective regarding the dynamics and extreme consequences of abuse. On October 22, 2008, Brenda Clubine was released from prison after serving 26 years for defending herself against her abusive husband. She is the founder of Convicted Women Against Abuse (CWAA), the first abuse support group within the U.S. prison system. Her story is the subject of the life-changing documentary Sin By Silence.

Since Brenda was released on October 22, 2008, she has traveled across the U.S. as a professional speaker and advocate for victims of abuse. She is the Founder and Executive Director of Every 9 Seconds, an organization that advocates for incarcerated abuse victims. She now continues with her advocacy by speaking out about the dangers of abusive relationships in hopes that people will continue to make a difference in the struggle against domestic violence.

Mary Heinen is a long-time Prisoners' Rights Activist and a Reentry Specialist. She went to prison in 1976 and within months of entering prison, she became an outspoken advocate for women. She was the lead plaintiff in the landmark case, Glover v. Johnson, which secured gender equity in prison educational and vocational programming and held prisoners have the constitutional right to access to the courts. While incarcerated, Heinen earned a paralegal degree and two bachelor degrees and assisted thousands of women and their families with legal issues. Heinen was released in 2002, when Michigan Governor John Engler commuted her life sentence. Since her release, she has served on the Working Group on Reentry in Lansing, the statewide Michigan Prisoner Reentry Initiative, and the Reentry Roundtable in Grand Rapids. She is the co-founder of the Prison Creative Arts Project, which provides university workshops and networking opportunities for incarcerated youth and adults in Michigan and hosts the Annual Exhibition of Art by Michigan Prisoners. She also co-founded the national Prison Arts Coalition in CA at CR10 in 2008. She was selected as an Open Society Foundation Fellow in 2011 and developed a reentry project to help people returning from Michigan correctional facilities to advocate for themselves and determine their own needs. In 2012, Mary received her MSW from the University of Michigan.

Antoinette M. Johnson is a formerly incarcerated survivor. She has extensive knowledge of the issue of domestic violence and the incarceration of battered women because she has lived and overcome both. In her role as a consultant to the Kentucky Domestic Violence Association, Ms. Johnson serves as a speaker on their Formerly Incarcerated Women's Speaker's Bureau and a group facilitator for the KDVA 2nd Chance Coaches' Project. Ms. Johnson also advocates on behalf of those like her and shares her personal experience with youth groups, university students, and others interested in ending domestic violence. Currently, Ms. Johnson is pursuing a degree in Criminal Justice and resides in Louisville, KY.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#5 — When the Battered Mother is Incarcerated: Impact of the Child Welfare System

Webinar date: July 15, 2013

Webinar Description: The webinar will include a discussion of federal and state law as it pertains to children of incarcerated parents in foster care, with a specific focus on how these laws affect incarcerated and reentering battered mothers and other parents seeking to reunify with their children. There will be an examination of how requirements of federal laws such as the Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) and the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act impact these children and families. We will also discuss state law approaches to challenging issues involving casework with children of incarcerated parents. States have adopted a variety of approaches for addressing issues including: Are incarcerated parents entitled to reasonable efforts? What are reasonable efforts for incarcerated parents? How does incarceration factor into the grounds for termination of parental rights? Can parental incarceration be a compelling reason not to file a termination of parental rights petition? This webinar will examine how states have answered these challenging questions and discuss how advocates can incorporate lessons from these approaches to better support incarcerated and reentering battered mothers and other parents with children in foster care.

Presenter's Bio:

Kathleen Creamer is an attorney who has devoted her career to working with parents and children involved with the child welfare system. In her current position as a Stoneleigh Foundation Fellow, she does policy work to improve services to children and families of incarcerated parents. Prior to beginning her fellowship in May 2011, she worked as a staff attorney at Community Legal Services (CLS). In that capacity, she represented parents in all stages of dependency proceedings, including adjudication, permanency reviews, termination of parental rights trials and appeals. Her caseload included incarcerated parents. She also has prior experience with incarcerated parents as Director of Legal Services at Our Place, DC, a program that provides supportive services to women during and after incarceration. Prior to her position at Our Place DC, Ms. Creamer served as a law clerk to the Honorable J. Michael Ryan of the D.C. Superior Court Family Court. She obtained her law degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#6 & 7 — Women at the Crossroads: DV Survivors with Criminal Justice Involvement, Parts 1 & 2

Webinar date: September 12 and September 23, 2013

PART 1 Webinar Description: Women are among the fastest growing criminal justice population. Currently, there are over one million adult women involved in the criminal justice system. The reasons for their involvement are as varied as their pathways into and contact with the system. A consistent thread throughout the lives of justice-involved women is trauma resulting from domestic, sexual or other types of violence. Throughout their lives, justice-involved women may encounter various criminal justice practitioners and service providers charged with assisting them prior to, during, or after incarceration. It is critical to understand that women have life circumstances that are unique to their gender that require specific interventions. Obtaining a better understanding of what contributes to their incarceration is at the core of helping them transition back to their communities, reducing recidivism, and achieving improved outcomes

This webinar - the first in a two-part series - will include a discussion of:

PART 2 Webinar Description: At year-end 2007, there were more than 1.27 million women in prison or jail, or on parole or probation in the U.S. As of 2009, approximately two-thirds of women in state prison were incarcerated for non-violent offenses including drug, property, or public order offenses. According to the Centers for Disease Control, nearly 3 in 10 women in the U.S. have experienced physical or sexual violence and/or stalking by a partner. Histories of economic and social marginality, substance abuse, mental illness, physical and sexual abuse in childhood and/or as an adult (including adulthood abusive families and battering relationships) have contributed to women's criminal justice involvement. Connecting reentering women with community-based support services designed to deal with their unique challenges is critical to their long-term success.

This webinar - the second in a two-part presentation - will include a discussion of:

Presenter's Bios:

Becki Ney (Parts 1 & 2) a Principal and founding member of the Center for Effective Public Policy (CEPP), has directed numerous national training and technical assistance (TTA) projects that have focused on issues of evidence-based practices, domestic violence, justice-involved women and families, and sex offender management. She is currently the Project Director of the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women (NRCJIW), which provides resources, disseminates research findings, and coordinates TTA to jurisdictions throughout the country. Ms. Ney's experience includes directing the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) sponsored Improving the Community Responses for Women Offenders project. Most recently she pilot tested the NIC Gender-Informed Practices Assessment for facilities and provided TTA on gender responsiveness at the state and local levels. In collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), she has served as Director of the Mother Child Community Corrections Project and Prisoner Reentry Initiative Training and Technical Assistance (PRI TTA) Program for which she spearheaded the development of several "coaching packets" on key topics to assist jurisdictions in understanding the practical application of evidence-based principles and offender reentry best practices. She holds a B.A. in Psychology and Sociology from La Salle University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and an M.S. in Criminology from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Georgia Lerner (Parts 1 & 2) is the Executive Director of the Women's Prison Association (WPA). The WPA, the oldest advocacy group for women in the United States, provides direct services to about 2,500 women at all stages of involvement in the criminal justice system through residential and non-residential programs located in New York City, and in the New York City jail and New York State prisons. In addition to working with justice-involved women and their families, WPA works to reduce reliance on incarceration, and partners with affected women and public and private agencies in efforts to promote improvements to the systems with which justice-involved women and their families must interact. In this capacity, Ms. Lerner has participated in numerous symposia and roundtables on alternatives to incarceration, family supports and reentry and is considered an authority on the needs of formerly-incarcerated women. As a long-standing leader in the development of evidence-based and gender-informed research, tools, and resources for the criminal justice field, Ms. Lerner and the WPA serves as a collaborative partner to the NRCJIW and the pursuit of rigorous policy, advocacy, and research agenda to bring new perspectives to public debates on women and criminal justice. She has an M.A. in Human Sexuality/Health Education and a J.D. from Fordham University School of Law.

Sharon White-Harrigan (Part 2) became involved with women's advocacy during her 11 years in Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for women. Once released it became her sole purpose to become the voice of the unheard and promote change. Mrs. White-Harrigan is an active advocate and activist for women in and out of prison system. She is an alumnae member of Reconnect and WAP, both advocacy groups for women.

Mrs. White- Harrigan is the Director of Drew House for Housing + Solutions that provides women with permanent housing while providing the necessary tools and skills for them to become self-sufficient and was the Deputy Director of Women of Integrity, an organization for women based on empowerment and provides wrap-around supportive services as well as emergency, transitional, and permanent housing for the homeless, formerly incarcerated, and women in need and former Program Manager of Exodus Transitional Community

Unfortunately, due to technical problems there is no recording of Part 1.

Copies of the PowerPoint and handout from the webinar (part 1) are available by clicking here

Click Here to Access Recording for Part 2

The PowerPoint will launch once you sign in and begin listening to the recording. If you want to save or print a copy of the Powerpoint you can get it (and any other documents from the webinar) by clicking here.


These webinars are supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

#8 — Sister Outsider: The Long Journey Home for Incarcerated Survivors of Battering

Webinar date: November 20, 2013

Webinar Description: This webinar will address issues that are central to a battered incarcerated woman returning to the community and regaining her life. In this session, April Young, an activist and survivor who was formerly incarcerated, and Sandra Barnhill, an attorney and prisoners' rights activist, will talk openly and candidly about the struggles incarcerated battered women face when they reenter the community. They will offer "real world techniques and solutions" for women who are in the reentry process, their families, and the advocates who support them, which are grounded in personal experience and over 25 years of frontline practice.

This webinar will include a discussion of:

Presenter's Bios:

Sandra Barnhill, an attorney, is the Founder and President of Foreverfamily, Inc., formerly Aid to Children of Imprisoned Mothers, Inc. (AIM), a national nonprofit that provides direct service programming for children and families affected by parental incarceration. It in its 26 years, Foreverfamily has provided services to over 15,000 children with a parent in prison. Ms. Barnhill's pioneering work has been recognized by the Ford Foundation. In 2004, she was selected as one of eighteen recipients of their Leadership for a Changing World Award. She also received an Annie E.Casey Foundation Fellowship. Among her honors was selection in 2009 as One of Atlanta's Top 100 Black Women of Influence by the Atlanta Business League. She is also on the Board of Visitors for the College of Arts & Sciences at her alma mater, Georgia State University and other board memberships include Men Stopping Violence and National Network on Women in Prison. Ms. Barnhill was a 2011 Visiting Fellow at the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College where during the Spring Term, she team taught a class on social justice and spent concentrated time researching and writing her first book. She received her Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from the University of Texas at Austin School of Law.

April Marie Young, a native of Fort Wayne, Indiana, is the mother of five children and is a member of the Board of Directors of Keeping the Bonds, Inc., a nonprofit that provides pro bono legal assistance to incarcerated mothers. April knows firsthand the need for the agency's services. During the eighteen months she was incarcerated in a Georgia women's prison, April's children resided with their grandmother in Indiana. Over the last thirteen years she has been able to reunite with all her children. Ms. Young, a survivor of domestic violence and a recovering addict, who has been clean for 15 years, turned her adversity into victory, and became an advocate for other women who are similarly situated. Her other community service includes volunteering at the Atlanta Day Shelter, Foreverfamily, Inc., and being a member of the Board of Directors of Women at the Well Transitional Center where she was also a mentor. April is currently employed by Concessions H&H and has worked for the company for nine years as a server at their airport location. In 2005, she received the Hartsfield-Jackson Ambassador Award and has also been featured in the Airport News for her outstanding customer service and commitment to excellence. Ms. Young is the first black woman to receive a pardon in the state of Georgia.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#9 — Reentering and Reuniting: Incarcerated Survivors of Battering and their Children

Webinar date: May 19, 2014

Webinar Description: All people reentering their communities after spending time in jail or prison face numerous challenges, but for those people who have children, they may face many additional difficulties. And when that parent is a survivor of battering, her relationship with her children may be extremely complicated. In this webinar, Sandra Barnhill, an attorney and prisoners' rights activist, will offer practical steps and actions women in the reentry process can take to strengthen their efforts to reunite with their children. Ms. Barnhill's 27 years of frontline practice informs her work and guides her recommendations on family reunification.

When entering prison, survivors who have children have to make the difficult and emotional decision about who will care for their children while they are locked up. Placement options can include family members, other adults not related to the survivor, or the foster care system. This webinar will examine these possible placements options and the ramifications of each for the children and the incarcerated mother as well as outline steps incarcerated survivors can take to plan for their reunification with their children while incarcerated and upon release.

Presenter's Bio:

Sandra Barnhill, an attorney, is the Founder and President of Foreverfamily, Inc., formerly Aid to Children of Imprisoned Mothers, Inc. (AIM), a national nonprofit that provides direct service programming for children and families affected by parental incarceration. In its 26 years, Foreverfamily has provided services to over 15,000 children with a parent in prison. Ms. Barnhill's pioneering work has been recognized by the Ford Foundation. In 2004, she was selected as one of eighteen recipients of their Leadership for a Changing World award. She also received an Annie E. Casey Foundation Fellowship. Among her honors, Ms. Barnhill was selected in 2009 as one of Atlanta's Top 100 Black Women of Influence by the Atlanta Business League. She is also on the Board of Visitors for the College of Arts & Sciences at her alma mater, Georgia State University, and other board memberships include Men Stopping Violence and National Network on Women in Prison. Ms. Barnhill was a 2011 Visiting Fellow at the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College where, during the Spring Term, she team-taught a class on social justice and spent concentrated time researching and writing her first book. She received her Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from the University of Texas at Austin School of Law.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is partially supported by the Family Violence Prevention & Services Program of the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DHHS or the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#10 — Justice-Involved Women: Understanding Trauma and Violence

This webinar is closed captioned

Webinar date: November 12, 2014

Webinar Description: Due to the increasing number of women in correctional settings, there is a growing recognition of the need for gender-responsive and trauma-informed services due, in large part, to an increasing understanding of the prevalence and impact of trauma in their lives. Recognizing that the vast majority of these women will be released, the need for effective programming for incarcerated women is critical in helping them successfully reenter their communities after being released. However, too often the (few) programs that do exist for incarcerated women fail to make the needed connections between abuse, trauma, and subsequent violence.

This webinar will focus on both the violence and aggression - including interpersonal and domestic violence - women have experienced as well as when they have perpetrated. It will be conducted by Stephanie Covington, an internationally renowned trauma expert and trainer. In the webinar, Dr. Covington will introduce a new evidence-based curriculum entitled Beyond Violence which is designed for women who are in criminal justice settings (jails, prisons, and community corrections) with histories of aggression and/or violence. The curriculum addresses the factors that put people at risk for experiencing and/or inflicting violence.

Presenter's Bio:

Dr. Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., L.C.S.W. is a clinician, organizational consultant, and lecturer. For over twenty-five years her work has focused on the creation of gender-responsive and trauma-informed services. Her extensive experience includes designing women's services at the Betty Ford Center, developing programs for women in criminal justice settings, and being the featured therapist on the Oprah Winfrey Network TV show entitled "Breaking Down the Bars." She has also served as a consultant to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna and was selected for the federal Advisory Council on Women's Services. Educated at Columbia University and the Union Institute, Dr. Covington has served on the faculties of the University of Southern California, San Diego State University, and the California School of Professional Psychology. She has published extensively, including six gender-responsive, trauma-informed treatment curricula. Dr. Covington is based in La Jolla, California, where she is co-director of both the Institute for Relational Development and the Center for Gender and Justice.

Suggested Participants: Anyone currently working with or planning to work with charged, incarcerated, and reentering women and/or victims of battering will benefit from this webinar. This may include community- and system-based advocates, reentry program staff, criminal justice professionals (including probation and parole officers) and community corrections staff.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is partially supported by the Family Violence Prevention & Services Program of the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DHHS or the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#11 — Her Size 10 Feet Won't Fit Comfortably in His Size 10 Shoes: Working with Reentering Victims of Trauma

This webinar was originally presented on April 24, 2015. However, due to technical difficulties, it was presented again on June 10, 2015.

Webinar Description: The presenters are Co-Founders of I'm FREE - Females Reentering Empowering Each Other, a Philadelphia-based women's reentry program. Recognizing that our prisons and jails are filled with victims of trauma and that reentry begins while women are inside jail (or prison), they run a 6-week program at the Philadelphia's jail called Transforming One Woman at a Time: Reintegration Support (T1W). This webinar will focus on why they developed a gender-responsive and trauma-informed program, the philosophy that guides their program, the impact of trauma on group participants (including pathways to being arrested), and lessons learned. Additionally, one of the program's participants will share her experiences, including her work with I'm FREE. By talking about their approach to serving justice-involved women, the presenters hope to inspire and inform others who are working with - or plan to work with - incarcerated and imprisoned women. There will be time for questions.

INFORMATION ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

Dr. Renaya Furtick Wheelan and Ms. Petrena Young are the Co-Founders of I'm FREE (Females Reentering Empowering Each Other), a trauma-informed, gender-responsive non-profit serving Philadelphia's female returning citizens, established in 2011. As part of their program, they co-facilitate Transforming One Woman at a Time: Reintegration Support, a 6-week cognitive behavioral development and transformation training, designed by Dr. Furtick Wheelan, for women reentering the community from a corrections setting. They have presented about their work locally, nationally and internationally. They recently contributed a chapter to Africentric Social Work: Best Practices in Working with African Communities in the Diaspora to be published in the fall of 2015. In 2013, they were named Extraordinary Citizens by the Philadelphia Branch of the NAACP for their work with incarcerated women. Both are trained to administer the Women's Risk/Needs Assessment (WRNA) for incarcerated adult women, which allows services to be targeted to a woman's specific needs.

Suggested Participants: Anyone currently working with, or planning to work with, charged, incarcerated, and reentering women and/or victims of battering will benefit from this webinar. This may include community- and system-based advocates, reentry program staff, criminal justice professionals (including probation and parole officers) and community corrections staff.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is partially supported by the Family Violence Prevention & Services Program of the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DHHS or the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#12 — Violence, Trauma, and Reentering Women Living with HIV: Issues to Consider

Webinar date: November 5, 2015

Webinar Description: Women living with HIV are five times more likely to have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and twice as likely to have been the victim of intimate partner violence compared to a national sample of American women without HIV. Women with HIV who experienced recent trauma are over four times more likely to fail their HIV treatment and almost four times more likely to be unable to negotiate or engage in safer sex and drug use practices than those without HIV. Women living with HIV face violence at the individual, community, and institutional levels. Given these realities, what are the implications for women living with HIV who are reentering their communities after serving time in jail or prison?

In this webinar, speakers will address fundamental issues that underlie the challenges of working with reentering women who are living with HIV. Women with heightened HIV risk factors and criminal justice involvement often live with histories of trauma, mental health, and/or substance abuse histories. The webinar will address the importance of a) implementing trauma-informed approaches; b) developing connections between reentering women and vital community resources; and c) continuity of medical care. The speakers will discuss the connections between violence and trauma and increased vulnerabilities for women living with HIV. They will discuss the value of addressing stigma and empowering women by developing community and other support systems. The speakers will also address and highlight common unhelpful practices, as well as what advocates and other practitioners can and should do to be more helpful to reentering women who are living with HIV.

INFORMATION ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

Elisabeth Long is a Community Educator and organizer focused on transformation, justice and healing at the intersections of intimate and state violence. She's passionate about roots (those we need to feed and those we need to pull up), supporting and celebrating survivor self-determination and building movements for collective liberation where people's full selves are honored and affirmed and no one is left behind. Currently, she serves as the Co-Coordinator of TEACH Outside, an educational program for people living with HIV who have experienced incarceration, at Philadelphia FIGHT's Institute for Community Justice. Prior to her time in Philadelphia, Elisabeth served as an LGBTQ anti-violence trainer and board member at Survivors Organizing for Liberation (formerly the Colorado Anti-Violence Program) and co-founded the Elephant Circle's Intimate Partner Survivors Prison Project, a program for imprisoned survivors of intimate partner violence focused on political education, community organizing and healing from violence and trauma. In 2014, Elisabeth earned her M.A. in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago, where she was involved in the community- and youth-led struggle for a trauma center on the Southside of Chicago.

Teresa Sullivan is an African-American woman openly living with HIV who helped found and launch the Philadelphia Regional Chapter of Positive Women's Network (PWN)-USA. PWN is a network of HIV positive women around the world whose mission is to strengthen the collective power of HIV Positive women to impact, create and design policies and programs that truly meet women needs. Currently, Ms. Sullivan is a senior member of the Philadelphia Regional Chapter and sits on the PWN-USA National Board of Directors. Ms. Sullivan is the Co-Coordinator for Philadelphia FIGHT's TEACH Outside, an educational program for people living with HIV who have been incarcerated, and a graduate of the Black AIDS Institute's Black Treatment Advocates Network (BTAN) training. She is passionate about the intersections between HIV and mass incarceration. In 2011, Ms. Sullivan created and organized the first-ever Philadelphia Summit on Harm Reduction for Sex Workers. She is a community organizer for the Support Center Advocacy, which is a grassroots coalition that does community outreach and acts as a resource center without walls for individuals coming home from prison and jail. Ms. Sullivan spearheads outreach into communities most impacted by the crisis of mass imprisonment and helps organize neighborhood level steering committees to address reentry needs. Ms. Sullivan was honored this year as an outstanding leader in her community, career and family from the International Women's Leadership Association.

Suggested Participants: Anyone currently working with, or planning to work with, charged, incarcerated, and reentering women and/or victims of battering will benefit from this webinar. This may include community- and system-based advocates, reentry program staff, criminal justice professionals (including probation and parole officers) and community corrections staff.

Note: Due to technical difficulties the recording of this webinar does not include the PowerPoint presentation; it only includes the audio presentation. We encourage you to get the PowerPoint (see link below) and follow along. We think the transitions between the slides are pretty easy to figure out.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is partially supported by the Family Violence Prevention & Services Program of the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DHHS or the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.


#13 — Changes from the Inside Out: Yoga and Meditation with Incarcerated Individuals

Webinar date: November 9, 2015

Webinar Description: After practicing yoga for over a decade, Sue Julian and Barbara Steinke founded Laotong Yoga, Inc. in 2013. Located in Charleston, WV, Laotong Yoga, Inc. is "dedicated to improving individual health and wellness through the inquiry of movement (yoga) and stillness (meditation) in ways that deepen inner connections to self, others, and the world." In the first year of operation, Sue and Barbara started the Laotong Prison Project, bringing mindfulness practices into the only women's prison in West Virginia. Since 2014, they have also been guiding classes at a maximum security prison for men.

This webinar will include information about:

INFORMATION ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

In 2013, Sue Julian and Barbara Steinke founded Laotong Yoga, Inc., located in Charleston, WV. They are both certified yoga instructors. Barbara is a registered Yoga Instructor and is certified in Shake Your Soul and Kirpalu YogaDance. Sue is a Professional Level Kripalu Yoga Teacher and is certified in Kripalu YogaDance. Barbara and Sue also completed the 40-Hour Certified Trauma Sensitive Yoga program. Both teach at The Folded Leaf yoga studio in Charleston, WV, and, since September 2013, Sue and Barbara guide yoga classes at West Virginia's only prison for women, Lakin Correctional Center in Mason County, and at the maximum security prison for men, Mt. Olive Correctional Complex in Fayette County.

Before founding Laotong Yoga, Barbara was a federal court reporter in US District Court, Charleston, WV Division, and Sue was Team Coordinator of the West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence. They both held their positions for 30 years.

Suggested Participants: Anyone currently teaching yoga or mindfulness based practices in a jail or prison setting as well as those planning to bring yoga or meditation into a jail or prison; those working with (or planning to work with) incarcerated and reentering women and/or victims of battering; activists and other practitioners who meditate or practice yoga; and fans of Sue Julian and Barbara Steinke!

Note: Due to technical difficulties the recording of this webinar does not include the PowerPoint presentation; it only includes the audio presentation. We encourage you to get the PowerPoint (see link below) and follow along. We think the transitions between the slides are pretty easy to figure out.

Click Here to Access Recording

The PowerPoint (and any other documents from the webinar) is available by clicking here.


This webinar is partially supported by the Family Violence Prevention & Services Program of the US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DHHS or the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.